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2018 February Art Dare

CINEMAGRAPHS

A cinemagraph is a still photo with an isolated pocket of looping video.
Create a cinemagraph that captures an interesting movement.
Learn how to create a cinemagraph!

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Cinemagraph, Michelle Song
Cinemagraph, Michelle Song

Michelle Song
China

Prize
“Who?”
cinemagraphs

“When I was looking through the cinemagraphs from Art Prof, I liked the playful and ominous tone that the videos portrayed. I thought that the February Art Dare would be fun to do because I’ve always been interested in making videos and working with cameras.

When creating the cinemagraphs, I played around with the lighting and color by testing different colored gel sheets to use on the light source. I decided to use red light because I felt that it created a mysterious atmosphere, which is what appealed and stuck out to me the most when I looked at cinemagraph examples.

These pieces were made in the school photo room, so I used objects I could find around me that were related to one another (a mirror and a mask) and thought of ideas and what I could do based on the two objects.”

 

Ashley Bolling, Art Teacher

Ashley Bolling
Art teacher’s prize

“We started out by looking at the various links provided on Art Prof. Students then ventured off and found other cinemagraphs on their own. This lead to a discuss of what makes them ‘good.’ We talked about how all of these cinemagraphs could stand alone as amazing photographs without any movement.

The artists paid attention to lighting and composition just as much as the particular movement. Students also talked about how too much of a certain kind of movement makes a cinemagraph feel more like a film, and how to avoid that.

What I observed from them creating their pieces is that the first one they create is their ‘learning’ one. Just like any artistic process, they learn from that first one and do the subsequent ones better. It was hard for some of them to accept this at first, but once they got the sequence down they could create the bare bones of their project within 15 minutes or less.”

 

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