Skip to main content
Get Project Ideas Notifications

Prompt

Create an animated film using a live person.

Core Ideas

Movement, timing, space

Recommended Courses

Supplies

Process

1.
Pick an indoor space with a lot of open space and have your actor sit on the floor.

Have the actor sit cross legged with their arms out, as if holding a steering wheel.  

Pixilation Animation

2.
Set up the smartphone on the cell phone holder and open the Stop Motion Studio app. Set up the first image so that you can see the actor from the front.

Art Supplies: Cell Phone Holder
Pixilation Animation

3.
Have your actor freeze in the steering wheel position, and take a photo of them.

Pixilation Animation

4.
Have the actor move their body in any direction about 1’, get back into the steering wheel position, and freeze. Take a photo.

Repeat step 4, having the actor drive their way around the room in any direction, until you have taken at least 25 photos.

Pixilation Animation

5.
In the Stop Motion Studio app, change the speed to faster or slower, by changing the frames per second.

For tips on the Stop Motion Studio app, watch the video below starting at 03:29 min.

Pixilation Animation
iMotion app

6.
Once you’ve found a speed you like, export the movie into your camera roll.

Options:

-Replace your driver with another actor at some point.

-Have another actor “magically” appear .

-Have the actor in a flying position. (lie on their stomach with arms spread out).

Pixilation Animation

Examples

Victoria Lin

“Back when the Vine app was still around, my brother and I watched a trend where people would make stop motion animations of their friends flying on a broomstick or other silly movements. We both wanted to give it a try but never had the time or idea to but now that I received this prompt, we were more than excited to finally try the stop motion fun.

I didn’t want to do the idea the project gave me of just doing a driver, so I played around with other ideas like slithering, going up the stairs, levitating, and riding a cardboard box. This project instantly became so much more fun when I did other ideas.

I originally didn’t want sound effects and even though I still added them, it made the animation too comical. The redeeming factor to the sounds is that I was able to define my brother like he was paper. So through the sounds, I had a theme of making my brother seem like a floating piece of paper which was weird and quirky but I loved this idea.

Stop motion is not hard at all; you just need an interesting idea and execution plan. For example, when I wanted my brother to go up the stairs, I made him slide down backwards and reversed the images instead. If I do this project again, I would find a larger location and do even crazier animations like transformations.”

Karas Cowger

“Pixilation was an interesting animation to do, considering just how wonky and silly the results could become! It was a project I never would’ve imagined myself doing, but it’s honestly a lot more enjoyable and less intense than regular animation.

It was so interesting to see your actor levitate and scoot against the floor like magic. The options in this project, since you are taking photos of real life, are endless. I found myself laughing and smiling like an idiot from the results I got. It can be tedious, but the whole point about pixilation is not for it to be perfect.

I found myself enjoying every second of it, because it was stress free and it felt like a fun project that the camera person and actor can both enjoy. The only difficult part of the process just had to be the amount of space you have provided. If you are lacking space, it can get a little more challenging in that aspect.

Since you are working with life, however, the opportunities to make the animation enjoyable without that much movement are totally possible.”

Purchase a critique or Skype consult

Donate to keep Art Prof free for all!

Donate
X